Elizabeth Schultz Interview

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  • Aaron Lane
    Aaron: So I guess we can start out um, just, tell me your name an'­ things like that uh, where you were born, whenever you'd like to begin,
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: yeh - My name is Elizabeth Scholtz,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: OkayElizabeth: and I'm ...eighty-five years old! (laughter)Aaron: uh-huh, where were you born at?
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: I was born in Jewell, Iowa, north of Ames, and, uh, I've lived different places, quite a few places, until I came here on the farm, then I stayed put. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: uh-huh, How - how'd you, how'd you get to the farm?Elizabeth: Well, in 1927 I came out here to teach a country school, and met my husband ,Aaron: uh-huhElizabeth: and got married, and settled down.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: uh-huh,Elizabeth: and been here ever since.Aaron: uh-huh,Aaron: How - how'd you meet your husband?
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Oh, over at the Trinity Lutheran church, [mumbled] right over there
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: What was your , um, you were born in, in Jewell, Iowa, or ..Elizabeth: Mm-hmAaron: What was your , um family like , uh, did you have a lot of brothers and sisters, or ..?Elizabeth: Oh, I just had ..two sisters, and then finally a baby brother
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Mm-hmmElizabeth: (laughter)Aaron: How old were you when he came around?Elizabeth: Thirteen! (laughter)Aaron: Oh! (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: So he was always quite a bit younger , um ...Aaron: Hm. Um, how 'bout your parents?Elizabeth: Well, my father ran a grain elevator and a lumber yard, and things like that, he was always in that kind of business, 'n, they were - good parents (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Yeah, what was that - what was the home life like? Just - got any -Elizabeth: well,Aaron: - good stories? (laughter)Elizabeth: (laughter) We didn't seem to have all the troubles that people have now-days. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Yeah.Elizabeth: (laughter) I think our home was peaceful 'n, we - read 'n, we didn't o' course have radio 'n television 'n all those things in those days so, we uh, read books 'n, things like that ..took music lessons o' course , (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Yeah, what did you play?Elizabeth: Just the piano.Aaron: 'Kay.Elizabeth: Little bit.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Yeah.Elizabeth: (laughter ) (Pause)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: You took your schooling, just um, at the at the high school , or , was it a - like a one-room school-house, or ..Elizabeth: Well , no, I've - my folks moved around quite a bit we'm, we've lived in different towns in Iowa 'n, I think I've attended ten different schools! (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Oh, yeah, so that was kinda hectic, hm?Elizabeth: I graduated up in Illinois, so, but I went one year at East High school in Des Moines, an' , uh, an' graduated out in Walnut, Illinois. Then we cam back to Iowa again n' , an .. o'course I had to find jobs 'n, finally ended up as a school teacher, (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah - wo ..now- you said you moved around a lot-where were the different places that you lived?Elizabeth: Well, Independence, Bode , Roland, (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah,Elizabeth: 'n, Iowa, an' , Mendota Illinois, 'n, back to Des Moines, 'n, out to Walnut Illinois, 'nd,Aaron: mmhm,Elizabeth: back to Des Moines again. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah - did your um, the whole family moved around a lot?Elizabeth: mm, hm, mmhm,Aaron: yeahElizabeth: my dad - sorta like to change places 'nd , start up in a new place 'n, so we just - traveled around , (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah,Elizabeth: (laughter )Aaron: Did he start a, like a grain elevator at each di fferent place - is that ...(?)Elizabeth: Well , sometimes he was - running fr - one for himself and then other times he was a hired manager for a farmer' s elevator ,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: uh-huhElizabeth: an' , uh, then he'd - get ti red o' that and he'd wanta do it on his own and, he'd - start up for himself , (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah ... how 'bout your mom?Elizabeth: Well, she was just a housewifeAaron: mmhm, that's okay,Elizabeth: - stayed home (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhm,Elizabeth: she was a good cook!Aaron: Yeah, yeah,Elizabeth: And ..she was a good seamstress, she always was sewing an' , making our clothes 'n, things like that,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: with our four kids, she was kinda busyAaron: Did you um, learn a lot - I mean, did she teach, teach you all the -Elizabeth: oh yeah,Aaron: - crafts, as I understand -?
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: well,Aaron: - you like to do a lot of craftsElizabeth: oh yeah well, we had to sew an' , cook an' (laugh), clean an' (laugh), help with the housework an' everything like that -- nnuh .. I guess she did - teach me some-well , I started sewing doll clothes I think when I was eight years old! (laughter )
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: oh really? Did you have a big collection?Elizabeth: Oh no. No ..hmh, but uh -- managed to keep, going, (laugh)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhm. Do you remember a lot about your grandparents?Elizabeth: Well, yes,m, my mother' s father lived with us, in Jewell, his wife had died 'n, he was in the Civil war , so, he had a lot of war stories an' things like that an' , an' he had some - buddies downtown that he - uh, played cards with an' things like that, uh, Decoration Day was really a big day in those times,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: an' uh, we'd - meet at the school house an' all the gi rls'd be dressed up in whi te dresses and everything and we'd parade down Main Street to the cemetary
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeahElizabeth: (laughter) an' my grandpa always carried the flag, at the head of the parade because he was a Civil War veteran. An' my parents folks lived in Hubbard, or my father's folks lived in Hubbard, Iowa. He was a retired preache r , an' uh, they had quite a big house. Looked big to us li'l kids anyway (laughter )
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeahElizabeth: an' uh, that house is still standing up in Hubbard , I've seen it lately.Aaron: uh-huhElizabeth: But um, it had the first indoor plumbing that I ever remembered. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Oh, that would have been pretty fancy (laughter )Elizabeth: Yeah, seemed real marvelous (laughter) And uh, and then later they lived in Des Moines an' , and uh, grew to be quite old
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: hm. Do you ever remember um any stor ies about like um, like coming over from England or -Elizabeth: Oh, noAaron: - Germany or France or something like that?Elizabeth: No, my grandparents all came from Switzerland.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Oh! Switzerland.Elizabeth: -the German part of Switzerland , so everybody talked German.Aaron: Oh, I see. Do you remember any? E: No,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: no -Elizabeth: -they tried to teach it to us kids, and we didn't learn it!Aaron: yeah, (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: huh, um, but when they'd wanted to say somethingthat we weren' t supposed to hear, then they'd talk German! (laughter)Aaron: Oh, right, yeah, birthday presents or something like that.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Mmhm. But uh, I had uh, my father had five sisters and two brothers, and my mother had a sister and a brother so I had those, that many aunts and uncles, and there were twenty-two of us cousins,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: [pause] [tape goes silent] wow,Elizabeth: (laughter) - on my father's side , then the re were eleven more on my mother' s side, so we had lots of cousins. And we would visit with them, we'd visit back and forth an' , and I got to know my cousins - I think people now-days don't even pay attent on to thei r cousins. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah, I've only got two, so it's easy. (laughter )Elizabeth: And uh, (pause) Well, I got out of highschool and I didn't have any training what-so-eve r for a job, and there weren't that many jobs for girls, see I graduated in 1925,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: and, so, my uncle got me a job at the telephone company in Des Moines, and, that was in the days before dial-phones at all,Aaron: yeahElizabeth: and you had to push the plugs in, an'
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeahElizabeth: - push the button to ring the bells, and ask the number please , (laughter)Aaron: uh-huh, yeah my grandma worked for the telephone company when she was nineteen years old, she sheElizabeth: mmhm
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah, I remember hearing all these stories about,Elizabeth: what town?Aaron: uh, Wichita Kansas?Elizabeth: oh, mmhm, well this was Des Moines, and there were four different offices I think, they sent me to an office close to my home so I could walk back and forth.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: uh-huhElizabeth: but I had to work split hours, then I had to walk home on East 9th Street at ten o-clock at night! (laughter)Aaron: oh, was that kinda scary?Elizabeth: I was afraid most of the time, but nothing ever happened.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeahElizabeth: It was safer in those days anyway,Aaron: yeah,Elizabeth: now-days a girl couldn' t do that at all (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But uh, then, I wasn't satisfied with that job, I, didn't like it, and I wanted to be a teacher so, in those days, you could be a s- country schoolteacher if you passed the county examinations, so I went down to the courthouse in Des Moines and took the examinations an' , passed it well enough to get a second degree certificate.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: An' , then I didn't know what to do with it, (laughter) but I met a girl, working in Des Moines, who came from Malcolm, and she says, "oh well I could get a country school any time I wanted it, but, she just knew a lot of people that knew a lot about country schools.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: I said, "well gimme a director' s name so I can write to him. An' she gave me F- Mr. Fred Litke 's name out here. I wrote him a letter, and put my picture in it, and he wrote back and hired me.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: Sixty dollars a month, (laughter) and I think it was only the fall term, which was two months,Aaron: mm,
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: They always took you on trial, you see, but I managed to stick out the whole year, and the second year , (laughter ) and uh, had to walk to school o' course, number 63 was just gravel.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: uh-huh, now what - which w- which road was six, number 63? That's highway si-Elizabeth: mmhmAaron: or that's the one that just goes­Elizabeth: mmhm, northAaron: -north.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: I lived at the p-, at the church parsonage with the preacher and his wife, when I first came out here, you had to board and room someplace, five dollars a week (cough) (laughter) and um, first thing I met the parents of my pupils.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: An' uh, they seemed to like me all right but, I , met my husband and I decided to get married so I quit teaching, and girls didn' t work after they were married then, we were supposed to stay home. (laughter) An' uh, but we got married in 1929, just shortly after the fall of Wall Street, you know, an' the Big Depression, (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: YeahElizabeth: And, times were kinda tough, um, everything was so cheap, um, farm products were cheap, an' , money was scarce, but we managed , some way or other (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: On the farm, we always had our own, a lot of our own food, so we weren't as hard up as some of the people in the cities at that time. But uh, my folks, uh, my husband' s folks had lived on this farm since their marriage in 1901, and, but they were going to move to town and let us have this house.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Well they did move to town, but uh, didn't like it, so they said "if we build you a house out on the farm, can we come back to the farm?" (laughter ) So they built a little house next door..
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: You let 'em come back -Elizabeth: for us, for us to live in, and they lived here until they passed on. An' then we moved back over here to the big house.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: So. We raise our two children over there in the small house, I think it was twenty-five years or more we lived there , an' then in 1956 we came back over to this house an' lived here ever since! (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: 63 years I think it is I've lived on this farm. (laughter)Aaron: yeah, lot of memories I bet.Elizabeth: An' o' course we always went to church over here at Trinity Lutheran
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Where about's is that?Elizabeth: Oh, about a mile and a half north. An' uh, took an active part in all those things.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: In 1944, I took on uh, the work of being a 4- H leader. Uh, a family here in the township wanted me to start up a club for Malcolm township. And so in a little country school house over north here one evening we organized the Malcolm Worth and Mirth 4-H club, which is still going. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: wow!Elizabeth: And uhm, I worked with 4-H for ten years as a leader of the gi rls and then 5 years on the county committee, and worked with the 4-H fair an' , an' , went to 4-H camp several times.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: There was a good camp up by Madrid, 4-H camp where the 4-H kids can go every year. (laughter) An' , that was lots of fun. So, but, after 15 years that's about enough of that too. So, I don't know what I did after that.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Well, my kids got married and they started having grandchildren, that's what happened next! (laughter) My son, I, we talked our son into living in the small house here on the farm, an' helping us out with the farm an' going into partnership with his dad,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: [pause] mmhmElizabeth: An' they lived there, an', had six children. (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: And um, I was busy, helping with them, sewing clothes for 'em, they would run in and out o' my house [tape cuts out] all the time. (laughter) And um, 'course they finally grew up too, and got married, [tape cuts out] and had children. (laughter) So now I have 19 great-grand-children!Aaron: hm, That's a joy
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: (laughter) don't see them all very often, but uh, there's nineteen of 'em. Guess the oldest one's sixteen now. And the youngest ones are three. Three years ago I had three grandsons born in the same month. (laughter)Aaron: wow !Elizabeth: One was a pair of twins! (laughter)Aaron: Mm! [tape cut out]
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: So.Aaron: What are you, oh, I, sorry, (laugh) I was just gonna, um, [tape cuts back in] wonder if you could tell me a little more about the country school that you worked at.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Well it was just one of the older buildi ngs in the county, at that time there was a country school every two miles, throughout the whole state, I guess, so that the child wouldn' t have to walk more than one mile to school.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: He would go to the school that was closest to his home. An' o' course I had to walk a mile and a quarter from the, from the parsonage up here where I was staying, through the winter and everything, and I don't know how I did it! (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Um, had to build the fires, had to sweep and clean the school house after the kids had gone, an' uh, in the middle of the winter sometimes the mothers would bring us a hot cup of soup or something at noon, and we'd have a hot lunch, otherwise we just ate out of a lunch pail.
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: And uh, course we had programs, Box social, they tell me how they kidded my husband-to-be about buying my box at the Box social o' course, (laughter) I guess he had to pay a good price for it! (laughter)Aaron: yeah
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But uh, people did things like that in those days. We didn't have electricity, we didn't have indoor toilets, we didn't have running water or anything, we had a well outside of the school house so we had drinking water , and uh, I was lucky, I didn't have too many pupils, I think I only had seven the first year.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But I had one beginner , we called 'em. Had to teach her how to read and write you know, all this and that, (laughter) and, I really didn't have much training for the job but I managed to get along okay. They hired me for the second year , so that was proof that! (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: ...doing something right.Elizabeth: An uh, this girl that I started out in the first grade is living down in Brooklyn right now, her name is Mrs. Horace Davidson.Aaron: oh!
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: and uh, I can always remember how small and tiny she was, an', how good she was in school, (laughter ) how quickly she learned , an' everything. The boys weren' t too bad, you know, they always talk about the boys causing the teachers a lot of trouble but,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: the boys I had didn't, not too much. (cough) Course we had to sing, just had a little pump organ to play music on, and uh but, we could read the Bible and we could say a prayer in school in those days too...
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: an' so that was really, usually our sing, and and pray, and something like that are, almost all gone now, they just tore down the country schools you hardly see one anyplace.Aaron: Mmhm opening exercise, to But uh, the schools the country schools, [mumbled]
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: But uh, we have restored one up in Grinnell you know,Aaron: yeah, um, ? told me something about that, the ? 4-H crafts?Elizabeth: Mmhm, it used to be down here , on the way to Malcolm.
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: And uh, a group of us decided that it was worth preserving an, and showing what the schools really were like in those days.Aaron: MmhmElizabeth: Course this was a much more modern one, much better than the one I taught in, but uh, I helped with the work of it an' , an' un, am interested in that sort of thing.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah.Elizabeth: Now we've brought in a church an' a log cabin, have you been out there?Aaron: Oh, no, I haven't seen those.Elizabeth: Oh? Out at the 4-H fairgrounds.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah, it's been a while since I 've been out there.Elizabeth: MmhmAaron: I 'member them before though.Elizabeth: This summer we'll have to work on the log cabin I s'pose we , we've got it but we don't hardly know what to do with it! (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Yeah!Elizabeth: Needs a lot of repair.Aaron: Mmhm.Elizabeth: But we think it's worth preserving -Aaron: definitely.Elizabeth: - things like that for , well, the school children especially from uh, Middle School down there , like to come out to the country school
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeahElizabeth: An' we have them come, an' sit in the seats an' , an' we call them up to the front for recitationsAaron: yeahElizabeth: -just like we were doing a country school day, (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Mmhm,Elizabeth: an' they get a big kick outta that.Aaron: yeahElizabeth: An' especially writing with a pen and ink ,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Hey.Elizabeth: Just a pen dipped in ink to write with. (laughter ) And slates, we have some slates that they think are, cool I guess! (laughter)Aaron: Yeah (Pause)Elizabeth: But uh, ...
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: an' I, we've always gone to church over here , and I think I have had every office of the women' s organization-Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: -that there was to be had,Aaron: mmhrn
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: This is about the first year that I haven't had an office over there, I just decided it was time to let somebody else do it.Aaron: (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But, I think for , oh at least twenty years, I taught the adult Bible school, uh, Sunday school class. An' then for ten years I taught the Bible school classes that we had during the summer. Sometimes we'd have fifty children over there at our church, uh, out in the country that was quite a few.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: We'd pick up the neighbour kids an' , an' all of us teachers would bring our children an' we'd have Bible school. But uh, so I managed to keep busy in that way. (laughter) (whisper)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: How did the, how did the war affect ..?Elizabeth: You say war , nowAaron: I meant World War IIElizabeth: yeah, yeah, (laughter) I'm writing a, down some memories in a book , and it asks for my memories of history you know, my history goes back to World War I! (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: I was in the sixth grade during that time, and I can remember the very first Armistice day, November 11th, 1918, up in the little town of Bode they really celebrated, they had the Kaiser strung up on the flagpole, an' (laughter) burned him up later , and so on and so forth an' , and um, then let's see, World War II.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Well you can talk about World War I if you like,Elizabeth: (laughter)Aaron: all the memories that you like, here, (laughter) that's what we' re going after ,Elizabeth: yeah.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Well, um, I was in, I said I was in the sixth grade, they taught us to knit string washcloths, for the soldier boys, and all of us had to sit and knit, (laughter) and that's where I learned to knit, so I was glad I did.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: An' uh, an' o' course we had to buy war stamps, save your pennies and your nickels and buy a war stamp, and when you had five dollars worth you got a big stamp out of it, and so on and so forth, and that was very patriotic,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah,Elizabeth: (cough) Um, we were in a Norwegian town at that time an' we were the only family of German decent,Aaron: Ooh,Elizabeth: So we just had to kinda keep it quiet because everyone was so antagonistic you know to the Germans that uh, Kaiser Bill was something terrible. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeahElizabeth: So. But World war II, um, I, I heard the news on the radio, while my husband was out doing chores an' I can remember him coming in, and discussing it and everything, we thought maybe he'd have to go, um, but he was a farmer and he was a married man, so he wasn' t drafted.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But um, think there were twelve boys from our small country church over here that went into the service at that time, and they all came back alive! (laughter) One of them was held a German prisoner for some time but, but they all came back.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: And uh, then they just went on into other wars then the , I think David was about, David was drafted , my son was drafted then, and, when he got to be eighteen he had to sign up right away, and he was sent as a medic over to Germany, and drove an ambulance.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But there wasn' t any active war in Germany at that time. But he was right next to the Russian line and everything, and uh, served his two years. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: How did you see Grinnell change I mean er, the surrounding towns, I mean, both during, what are some of the big changes that you noticed, since,Elizabeth: mmhmAaron: either the first war , er , or the Depression and World War II, just, did you see attitudes change and , just um, social life change, or something?
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Oh, I s'pose so. Um, course our address was Malcolm at the time, and so, but, and Malcolm used to be quite a nice little town, it had a big drugstore , an' a big grocery store, an' and uh, Main Street was full of stores. Now there's hardly anything left.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: They've taken down some of the old stores, an' , but uh, oh, Grinnell, used to have a big Broadway store, they called it, on Broad Street which was a dry goods store, and then there was Mac Murray's Clothing store, over on the other corner , 'cross from Prestons, cross from Boklada I should say. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeahElizabeth: 'Course that was always Preston' s store in those days. And we had a big Penney's store, an' a, there was a grocery store where Ben Franklin' s is now, we used to take cream and eggs to town, when we did go, usually on Saturday,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: and that amount of money had to buy our groceries.Aaron: Oh!Elizabeth: (laughter) So, we didn't buy things and have things like you do now-days. Um, I saved a lot of our children's clothes, an' made do with what we had. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: What'd you do for um, like for fun, like to go out on Saturday night or somethingElizabeth: Well we didn't go out on Saturday nights.Aaron: or , or whatever -Elizabeth: yeah, I know,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Where there movie nights or something?Elizabeth: We had, we had quite a gang of young married people our age, and we would have square dances.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Oh! Wow.Elizabeth: yeah, but, we'd uh, they had dances in people' s homes, I don't know how they ever did it, but they'd roll up the rugs and they'd have a square dance. (laughter) An' um, one year we had a square dance in an actual great big barn, hayloft.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    A: oh,Elizabeth: (laughter) which was very much fun. An' uh, an' uh, different things like that. We even went roller-skating, and bob-sledding down hills in the winter time. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeahElizabeth: And uh, we had this group over at church that met one Sunday night a month, for a potluck supper , and uh, and, I think sometimes there must have been forty of us over there, with our children and all.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: And we'd play games, and socialize, and have fun that way. Once in a while we'd go to a movie , but movies didn't cost as much as they do now either. (laughter) But we had some good movies.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: What were some of the titles?Elizabeth: Oh, I don't really remember , but (laughter) I can remember back to when Mary Pickford was the main star! (laughte r )
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah,Elizabeth: And um, Jackie Coogan, and um, Charlie Chaplin! (laughter ) But that was long ago. And , I can remember ...(tape ends).
  • Aaron Lane
    Aaron: [pause for tape change]
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: We, we bo- we didn't have much new furniture, our , my husband' s folks gave us a few pieces and everything, you know an' , but we didn't even have electricity the first year we were married.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But um, we did buy a very special radio carved doors and everything, uh, stood up it wasn't set on the table, an' , that was the prize piece of our whole house (laughter) an' then we used to um have uh, what we would call soap operas now-days it just reading or acting, just vocal, on the radio.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Mother Mohaham (laughter) and her Painted Dreams was my story I had to watch, listen to it every day.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: What was that about?Elizabeth: Oh, a family, an' their troubles, and their , (laughter) just common, but uh, no violence and stuff life that, nothing like it is today.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But I can remember sitting there, with my babies (laughter) listening to that story. And then TV, was unbelievable, we just couldn't believe that you could see pictures. (laughter) And, then I think we were about one of the first to have colored television.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: We had been in the habit of going back and forth with another couple on New Year' s Day, and the year we got our colored TV I wouldn't go to her house on New Year' s Day 'cause I had to stay home and see the Rose Parade in color.(laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: So, that was really something to see that. And it is, to see all of these events, when they' re actually happening, you know, it's, it's marvelous. I couldn't get along without my TV. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeahElizabeth: You can see I sit here an' (laughter) right close every day,Aaron: yeah
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Every evening. Hm. But uh, and cars, we started out with a, my husband had a Chevy coupe when we dated, and then for our wedding I guess his parents gave him a Model T, blue, Ford coupe. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: fancy!Elizabeth: Then,'n, we had different cars. I can remember the first car with automatic transmission, you know, that was, another big, wonderful thing, not to have to shift those gearsAaron: yeah
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: I didn't learn to drive until after I was married , our folks never had a car or anything. So but I was detrrmined to learn how to drive so that I could go places (laughter)Aaron: yeah
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: And um, my husband would trade cars every once in a while, it usually turned out to be a chevy, but once we had a Buick, (laughter) and uh, now I have a Chevy Cavalier that suits me just fine. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: What do you, what do you remember about the winter of '36? I hear that was like, a real doozy.Elizabeth: (laughter) yes, it was.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Snowbanks, where you could just open it up enough for one car and there'd be banks as high as your car as you went through the tunnel, on the way to town. When the roads were bad you just stayed home, you didn' t go anyplace.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: But uh, in between the two houses here there must have been some bi g drifts. My daughter was only about two years old that year, and I have a picture of her sitting up on top of a big high snowbank. (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: I don't think we had snowplows and things like that either at that time , they didn't work the roads as quickly anyway. Uh, '36. I s'pose I even had a coal range yet at that time...
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: and sometimes we would burn ear corn in it instead of wood or or coal because ear corn was so cheap, and uh, everybody was doing that. But uh, that coal range was very nice on a cold morning, (laughter) but in the middle of the summer it was terrible! (laughter )
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah, yeahElizabeth: Was it the summer of '36 then that was so terribly hot? One summer it was just awful hot. so we bought a two-burner kerosene stove so we could cook on that instead of heating up the whole big range, in the kitchen
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeahElizabeth: and uh, no air conditioning, at that time I didn't even have running water in the house I guess, an'
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: we did have electricity, I guess we did have an electric fan, but uh, (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: How'd you keep things cool?Elizabeth: Lots of times we just took it down to the basement, can you imagine? (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Did you have like a spring house, or ,Elizabeth: Well, it was always cooler down there, an' , we had a little cupboard we put things in, some people had a contraption that they could lower into their well outdoors, and then crank it up and bring it up, when they wanted to use it.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But, I think I was about the first one uh, out here that got a Westing house refrigerator. That was when my daughter was a baby, and she had to have sweet milk, so we had to have some way of keeping that milk for her.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: And uh, my in-laws thought it was a terrible extravagance to have that refrigerator running all the time, (laughter) that took electricity, you know, so, but I've had a refrigerator ever since. (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But, that was a big 'n, new invention, too you know, a big convenience, compared to, well, I guess we just had to throw the food out, you know, just if it wouldn' t keep we had to throw it out. (laughter) We had chickens all over the farm, they would eat it up.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeahElizabeth: mm, we always raised a big garden, 'n I learned how to can vegetables, 'n, we would even can meat.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: When I first came out to live on the farm, butchering was a big deal. (laughter) They would maybe slaughter two hogs at a time , and then here would be all this meat, 'n they had to take care of it. They knew how to put all the hams down in brine, and then they smoked ham out of 'em, 'n then we would grind up all the sausage, 'n render all the lard, 'n,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: What does that mean? To render the lard?Elizabeth: cook 'n boi l it, the white fat out of the hog you know, you have to boil it very carefully so it don't scorch, (laughter)Aaron: Oh
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: 'n then there was a lard press you would put it in, 'n you would turn the crank and squeeze it all down 'n the lard would run out into jars, 'n you'd have your own lard. We used lard instead of vegetable oil (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: And um, but, uh, I was from the city, and having all that meat was just like, ten Christmases. (laughter)Aaron: yeah
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: an' it was so good. Then we had a smoke-house out in back , my husband knew how to, uh, make a hickory wood fire in there, and make smoke, and we'd smoke sausages, and they were mighty good too. (laughter) So. But we don't do any of those things anymore. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: What do you do on the farm now?Elizabeth: Just live here. (laughter)Aaron: yeah, I mean like, what are [indistinguishable?Elizabeth: Yeah. Well, I rent out my land now, and some other young boys up by the farm are doing all the work.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: uh-huhElizabeth: and they raise corn and beans an' , have a pasture full of sheep in the summer-time. And that's about all, we do- I have one cat. (laughter) No chickens, no dogs, or anything, (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: One year, we had the whole barn full of hens, we just, went into hens in a big way. (laughter) And I would have to pack those at, gather them in the first place, gather the eggs and then pack them into crates to be picked up, there was a man that went around through the country picking up your eggs in those days.
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: And the next week he'd bring you your check. but sometimes I'd have seven thirty-dozen egg cases in a week (laughter )Aaron: Geez, wowElizabeth: and that kept me busy. You'd have to see that they were clean, and if they weren't clean you had to wash 'em. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Did you have to hold them up before a little candle thing?Elizabeth: No, I didn't, we didn't do that. We put 'em down in the basement right away when we gathered them an' they were always, fresh I guess. (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: So, well, one year, I even ran some incubators and raised baby chickens. That was over in the small house, too. Uh, my mother-in-law, set hens. She had a whole system of boxes and things out in the back building, to set hens and put eggs under 'em and hatch her chickens naturally that way, you know.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Well I, I couldn't get on to that, I didn't like setting hens. (laughter) So we decided we'd run incubators. And we purchased some second-hand ones and put 'em down in our basement. Gathered our own eggs, an', picked out the nicest ones and set 'em.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Then you had to watch the tempe rature an' , you had to pull the trays out every day and roll the eggs, like a mother hen would roll her eggs you know, while she was hatching 'em or nesting 'em.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: So we had to roll those eggs, every day, and I think I got about five hundred baby chickens outta that. (laughter) But then they got sick and i only raised about 200 of 'em. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: And then we bought a broode r house too, used to be that they would just, not have chickens until it got warm enough to have them in a chicken house you know.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But, lot o' people were having brooder houses with a stove in 'em, a hover that would keep your baby chicks warm, so we went into it that way too. And uh, quite successful, and I would have fries for sale, so we'd put a sign out in front, "fries for sale ," an' people'd stop in and want a chicken.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: what's a fry, is that, just aElizabeth: a chicken to fry!Aaron: Oh! I see. Okay. (laughter) Not a french fry. (laughter)Elizabeth: No! (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: And one year , I would sell them for a dollar apiece, alive. I had a big long wire hook that i could go out and catch one alive and hand it to the fella and he'd gimme a dollar bill. (laughter)Aaron: uh-huh
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: But, then, toward , in several years, you couldn't even, kill 'em, and dress 'em, and wrap 'em up an' take 'em into Grinnell and sell 'em for a dollar. They'd want you to bring 'em delivered for 75 cents.Aaron: hm.
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: And I just quit. (laughter)Aaron: yeah. When was that, about,Elizabeth: Oh, oh, we were still over in the other house, so it must have been in the 1950's. (laughter ) Early 50's. But uh,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: And then were, how did things ha- change, like after the war in the, did things get better or worse, in terms of like the farm and stuff?Elizabeth: Well, I don't think we noticed too much difference.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: The prices go up and the prices go down, and , when you had things to sell the price was usually down. (laughter ) And um, but, we never bought anything on time, and we never had any debts, we'd just uh, course, my husband was an only child, so we inherited this farm, free and paid for , an'
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah,Elizabeth: so we never had big debts like that to worry about. pauseElizabeth: But my husband, got emphysema, for some reason or other.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: I think it was working in the hog houses and the chicken houses, and everything, it's hard on farmers' lungs, and so he was in and out of the hospital, we'd share the time, and finally died when he was only 61 years old, which was, twenty-two years ago.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But um, in 1956 we moved over here, and then that summer my mother was up in her 80's, and she was a widow, and so we brought her out here to live with us. And my mother lived with us for about ten years.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: And, that left me free to do my 4-H work o'cour se and things like that, she was a big help to me. But finally her health failed too and we put her in the Brookhaven nursing home in Brooklyn, but she died the same year my husband did , so,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Do you have any, what are your , some of your , fondest memories of, the farm, any big celebrations, or anything, family togetherness ...Elizabeth: Oh, my family would come out here, they expected us to come to Des Moines more than they came out here I guess.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: And my husband being an only child we didn't have that many, uh, rel, well, he did have some cousins an' we'd, get together , but, uh, Grinnell would, we'd usually go to Grinnell for the, 4th of July celebrations...
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: an' things like that you know it was, an' the state fair, we always had to go to the state fair every year , (laughter)Aaron: mmhm
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: and uh, (sniff) this, oh 'n then we uh, when my grandsons started, they had to go to, when they graduated from highschool they went into service,Aaron: oh, right
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: and, one of 'em went into the ai r force, an' one into the navy, 'n, two of 'em into the navy, an' uh, but there wasn' t any actual war right at that time that they had to see any actual, service, warfare.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Don't really remember anything special. (laughter) [Granddaughter: What were some of the names, like of your, brothers and sisters, and your parents and grandparents, your maiden name and your middle name,] [mumbled] (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: Well my maiden name was Pfund, P-F-U-N-D.Aaron: Oh.Elizabeth: it's a German name.Aaron: uh-huh
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: In German I think it means "pound", and it's pronounced "pfoont". (laughter) But we were Americans, we called it Pfund. My father was Carl Pfund, 'n, my mother' s name was Nell, 'n my husband' s mother' s name was Ella, so the first granddaughter' s name was Nella. Took the two grandmother' s together Nell and Ella.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: oh, okay. (laughter)Elizabeth: People often wondered, "where'd you find that name for your daughter." (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But she was the first grand-daughter , an' so she was Nell, Ella. Nella. (laughter) And um, I had a sister Ruth, who, traveled all over. She, she was something like my father, she had to be on the go all the time, an' she lived in different places.
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: Finally, sh- well first, what got her started, she worked for the Rock Island Railroad, an' she got free passes to take vacations and go on long train tripsAaron: uh-huh
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: and things, so she got to see a good deal of the United States. Then she got a job with the Department of Agriculture and worked for the government, and they sent her all over. She lived in Boise, Idaho, and Seattle Washington, and Auburn Alabama,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhm (laughter)Elizabeth: and Alexandria Vi rgina, and then they even sent her over to Amsterdam, and she worked in Holland for two or three years. Came back, and got married, no, she didn't get married, she got engaged, but she went back and lived another year in Amsterdam before she got married.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Then she lived in Florida. But, my baby brother, (laughter) graduated from Ames, as an electrical engineer, and then he went into the navy, 'n got out of the navy he went to school again and became a lawyer. So he' s a patent attorney out in Boston.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: He's coming back to Ames this summer for his 50th anniversary of his graduation from Ames! (laughter) So, and I have one other sister that lives in Des Moines. She, lived there all her life. (laughter) But uh...
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: what was her name?Elizabeth: Myrtle. Ruth, Myrtle and Charles. Shall I name the grand­ children? (laughter) [Grand-daughter: That's probably easier than the great-grand­ children, (laughter)] [mumbled]
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: Oh, I could name them all too i f I had top ! (laughter )Aaron: Sure! It's up to youElizabeth: I 'spose. Well there' s Kenneth Schultz
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: uh, Scott Markem is the oldest one, an' then Kenneth, an' then Jay Markem, and Cloyanne Schultz, and then Amanda Schultz, and then Jeffrey Schultz, (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Terry Schultz, and Christine Schultz. And they're all married and have children of their own now too, so that makes the nineteen great-grand-children. 'n they all live around here but one, Jay Marken is in the ceremonial navy band out in Washington D.C.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Oh,Elizabeth: All he does for a living is play his saxophone. (laughter)Aaron: Must be pretty nice. (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But now he's been accepted in the Naval Academy at Annapoli s to play in their band, so this summer he's going to change his location and go be in the Annapolis band. And, he likes it very well.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: They're all busy, (laughter) all healthy, (laughter) [pause]
  • Aaron Lane
    Aaron: I don't know what else to ask , I, i just, (laughter) [(to grand-daughter ) Is there any stories that you remember hearing that you would like to -] [Grand-daughter: um, I guess, upstairs you have that china doll , (laughter ) I just wondered where you got it, an' , an' why,] [all mumbled]
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Oh, well that belonged to my husband' s mother, and she played with it I s'pose when she was a youngster, but she didn't play very hard because it's still in good condition. Do you want to go up and get it, Jenny, do you know this bedroom, right up here.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: An' it must be over a hundred years old , because , my, mother-in-law was born in 1875, and I s'pose she had the doll when she was about ten, maybe, that'd be about 1885, (laughter) so, an' uh, my husband being an only child, I inherited all the antiques from his family,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: oh, uh-huh,Elizabeth: so I'm an antique hound, (laughter) I like old things,Aaron: yeahElizabeth: an' uh, appreciate them,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhm , what are some of your famous, your favorite um, heirlooms, orElizabeth: Well I have this walnut bookcase in here that belonged to my grand-father on my father's side, he was a preacher and I imagine he kept his books and things in that
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: uh-huhElizabeth: I inherited that from an aunt, (laughter) an'uh,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: (doll arrives) wow,Elizabeth: leather , leather hands, and socks
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: uh-huh (laughter )Elizabeth: But they say the blonde ones are quite unusual, more so than the black-haired ones
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: uh-huh (laughter ) but you made the dress?Elizabeth: Oh yeah. But some of her other things are, original. (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: crocheted.Aaron: oh, crocheted?Elizabeth: mmhm, mm, hm, I always played with dolls. I had to have a doll , every Christmas. (laughter)Aaron: mmhm [Jenny: I'm gettin' new roller skates, Thursday or Friday]
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: you don't have a birthday ...? [Grand-daughter: she's spoiled] Gonna get 'em anyway, huh? [Jenny: Carol' s gonna buy 'em]
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: [background mumbling] What are some of the other crafts you do?Elizabeth: Oh I knit, and crochet, and embroidery and, (laughter ) I don't go in for these newer crafts like cross- counted cross-stitch, I never did take it up because I didn't think my eyes could stand it
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: fine, but I've done uh, needle-point, I like to read library books, that's my hobby, (laughter) I usually have two or three library books on hand. An', raise flowers, I have a garden, so,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Do you quilt?Elizabeth: Oh yes, I've made , I've made, dozens and dozens of comforters, you know, just tied, instead of quilted, doesn't take so long to do them,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeahElizabeth: and I think everybody' s got a comforter or two from grandma, (laughter ) but I do quilt too, I like to piece 'em together , 'n, 'n uh, I have quilted one whole one, an then a wall- hanging, but it takes a long time to quilt a quilt, (laughter) so, but uh, (door slam)
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: be some noise stretches in your tape , (laughter )Aaron: yeah, it's not, it's not, it's just aElizabeth: mmhm, mmhm, hm, [Grand-daughter: ....(?)... cups and saucers and spoons, (laughter)]
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: oh, I think my sister sent me a cup and saucer , when she was over in Amsterdam she went to England I think , an' , oh she went everyplace. But, that was at the time that Queen Elizabeth the Second was coronated,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: oh,Elizabeth: and so they had a fancy cup and saucer with her picture on it and everything, and my sister ,._ me one of those. So then I just thought, well I'll, buy a pretty cup and saucer every once in a while.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Then I started taking some trips, 'n I decided eve ry state I went into, I'd get a cup and saucer for that state , well then my daughter went over to live in France with her husband in the navy, an' and she traveled around and she brought me a cup and saucer from Italy and Holland and France and...
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: did I say Italy, Switzerland, well no I don't have one Switzerland, from Switzerland, anyway, she brought me back some cups and saucers. So I think I've got fourteen foreign countries and about 34 states, (laughter)Aaron: yeahElizabeth: In the collection. Then I started gathering vases. I don't know when I started that, well, Nella had a, one of these blue vases in her house, in town, when they moved into an old house in Grinnell here was this pretty blue vase.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: So then I started gathering vases,Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: wherever I went. (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: 'n, well, then there was a few, milk glass pieces here in the house that belonged to my husband' s folks, so then I started pick ing up milk glass pieces, and they're different than just ordinary china. (laughter ) So I have quite a collection of those. But you don't find them anymore you know. You, just some of those things, have sorta disappeared from flea markets and
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeahElizabeth: places like that. But, an' I've got enough vases now I don't know where to put anymore, (laughter ) so I don't pick 'em up so much anymnore. . D
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah (laughter) I heard you have a nice old player piano [mumbled] up there.Elizabeth: yes, (laughter ) [Jenny: I know where it is, too.]
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: I um, my husband' s folks had that here in this house before 1929, i don't know how many years before that, but I imagine it was at least five or six, ten ....(tape ends)
  • Aaron Lane
    Aaron: [pause for tapw switch]
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: go ahead and start over.Elizabeth: My husband would bring me home to this house while we were dating and then we'd play that player piano, that was a great source of entertainment.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: uh-huh,Elizabeth: An' then o' course his folk s had it until they died, an' then I, we inherited it,Aaron: uh-huh
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: An' it's always been in this house. And uh, oh maybe, ten years ago, Mr. Ford, can't think of his first name, he refinishes and rebuilds player pianos, that's his life's work I guess, is to fix up old player pianos. He lives in Grinnell.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: uh-huhElizabeth: and , so I let him take it, and he refinished the wood even on it and it turned out to be a beautiful walnut wood,Aaron: uh-huh,Elizabeth: and he put a motor on it so I don't have to pump it. (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: And so now when the grand-children down or the great-grandchildren, they all think they have to play music all day long. (laughter) Well then, up in the attic were boxes and boxes of music rolls, so I have a lot of the old, old-timers, that still play, and uh, some of them are much prettier than the newer ones.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But, it's uh , sort of a novelty. I think the grand-daughters all learned to play music on that piano, I'd give 'em music lessons overhere, an' (laughter) get 'em started anyway. (to Jenn ) Are you taking music lessons too? Good! , Good! you'll have to play us a piece after, huh? (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Terry mentioned something [indistinguishable]Elizabeth: Oh, well there's a little entry to my house, and I had it sided with uh, panneled with barn boards,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: oh,Elizabeth: and I call it my wood-shed. (laughter) An' I have antiques out there, an' one of them is a sale bill , from my husband' s grandfather' s sale
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: When, when was that?Elizabeth: I think it 's, 1912 . ( ?) And he had , just a few pieces of machinery, just a few head of livestock , and yet he was a wealthy farmer.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: uh-huhElizabeth: He owned, three, at least three farms, and, this one, he sold to one son, and he had another son he sold one of his farms to, and he used to live up the road a ways, where, Dr. Weir lives, do you know, just a mile west here, is where Dr. Weir lives now.
  • Aaron Lane
    Aaron: Oh, Jerome Weir? (cough) Uh, Hendricksons used to live there. There' s uh, he had, uh, eight horses, ten cattle, 30 hogs, and this amount of machinery, and yet he was a rich man.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: uh-huh, (laughter) yeah, [mumbles something]Elizabeth: This is a century farm, it's been in the Schults farm, even before this fellow. So, but uh,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: And what' s this certificate here? This is a, marriage certificate.Elizabeth: That's the marriage certificate of my husband' s folks. They were married in 19 01, and they're the ones that built this house,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: kept this farm, and I s'pose they paid off the farm to his dad, but I s'pose it wasn't that expensive, (laughter) but they worked hard, they were awfully (?), they worked hard.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: It's quite ornate. (laughter) What are some of your other favorite antiques out in the pantry-or , out in the wood-shed. [Grand-daughter: i think you still have one of your egg-crates out there, don't you -]Elizabeth: Well, I put that away when I had a cat, I couldn't have it out there, my cat got into it -- I had an egg-crate an' I blew out some eggs, real eggs you know, and everybody thinks I have real eggs sitting out there,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: oh uh-huhElizabeth: but they're empty shells.Aaron: Oh, How do, how do you blow out an egg?Elizabeth: poke a hole in it, an' then, just shake it until it all comes out,Aaron: oh, okay
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: an' then the egg shell is whole,Aaron: uh-huh,Elizabeth: and, looks like an egg, (laughter)Aaron: yeah,
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: It was, quite a conversation piece. But last winter I had a cat,­ one cat, and I took pity on him and let him come in the house, just in the back part there,Aaron: uh-huhElizabeth: and he got to playing with the egg-shells, so
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: oh, yeahElizabeth: I took it outAaron: yeahElizabeth: and I didn't think I'd ever put up with a cat, but I like this cat, he's company for me now, (laughter )
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: but he sleeps down in the furnace room at night, out doors all day now, but, you sorta grow attached to something like that.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Well it's probably not the, the most fun subject, but what are some of your memories about the Depression?Elizabeth: oh it was coming on I s'pose when I was teaching and then it happened just as I quit teaching, but we didn' t, we didn't have fancy clothes or anything, I can't remember going to the store and buying any clothes when I was a teenager
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeahElizabeth: (laughter) And, I don't know how we got by, but, uh, and uh, well, I remember during the war , uh, they sold oleo, just white with a capsule and you had to break that capsule of color and work it into the oleo if you wanted yellow oleo to eat.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: oh, uh-huhElizabeth: And I remember telling my husband "I'm living on a farm, I'm not going to eat oleo " (laughter) And so we would take our own cream and I'd churn butter and we had butter. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Oh, uh-huh, do you still have the churn?Elizabeth: yes, I have the churn.Aaron: wow. (laughter) did you make the churn? or did you use-?Elizabeth: No, no, it's a glass jar.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: oh, uh-huh.Elizabeth: when we have our festival days, out at the 4-H grounds, we churn butter and show people how it's made.Aaron: uh-huh, yeah, bet a lot of people don't -Elizabeth: just, whip it in that jar until it's butter. (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: uh-huhElizabeth: cream.Aaron: uh-huh
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: And, we used to have cows, so we had our own cream, milk , we used to just drink the plain milk , an' then, you know, first thing you know it had to be pasteurized, so we got a pasteurizer , and i think when the grand-children were small, we pasteurized the milk for them,
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: uh-huhElizabeth: An' uh, but that was a, kindof a chore too.Aaron: yeah
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But uh, gasoline was only about 15 cents a gallon, so we didn't nearly, course our money wasn' t that much either , we were short of money, an' , but uh, prices weren' t nearly as high as they are now­ days. An' uh, we didn't go that much either , we just ...
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah (cough) Did you keep a lot of money in the banks, or , did you -?Elizabeth: I never even had a checking book , check book , until after my husband died,Aaron: oh, (laughter)
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: He would just hand out the money to me i f I wanted anything, an' and um, and if he didn't feel like giving me any I didn't get any l (laughter) oh I usually got about everything I wanted, but um, but I never had a check-book , never wrote a check until after he died.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: But we usually had money in the bank , and, and uh, when we traded cars we always paid for 'em with cash I guess, no, I don't remember ever having a time payment to pay.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: So the Depression didn't like, you didn't lose a lot of money in the banks or anything like thatElizabeth: Well, his folks did, my husband' s folks lost money in the Malcolm banks, some of the banks would close you know...
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: and they lost money in the Malcolm bank but I don't think we ever did, but we, my husband had the idea that we'd keep money in two banks, and if one went broke, they, we'd have money in the other one, so I still have money in two banks, (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: yeah,Elizabeth: just because we always did it that way. Hm. Now you really don't have to be afraid of the banks closing-Aaron: Hope not,Elizabeth: and losing your money, but his folks did, just shortly before we were married, I think they lost some.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhmElizabeth: But uh, there' s, there's just a 168 acres in this farm, which belonged to my husband' s father. Well then his mother inherited land up in Sheridan township, from her father , and so she passed it on down to her son who was my husband
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: mmhm,Elizabeth: so we've got two pieces of land (laughter) now.Aaron: oh wowElizabeth: but uh, I guess there was quite a, oh I shouldn't tell this (laughter)
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: It's up to youElizabeth: uh, my husband' s grandmother died, well then his grandfather married again, but there were three children, and they put up quite a squabble you know,Aaron: uh-huhElizabeth: and so this father had to sign a pre-nuptual agreement [laughter]
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: Which was something you didn't do in those days, I don't know.Aaron: Yeah.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Yeah [indistinguishable]Elizabeth: But, I [indistinguishable] but and then when he died, the children saw to it that they got the farmland that he owned and his second wife got a house in town and [mumbled]. So that's how we happen to have that piece of land [laughs]
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: His mother kind of fought for it [laughs]Aaron: Do you still farm it now?Elizabeth: Yeah. It's still in the family. I just ran it in the boys [indistinguishable] and they have to worry about the planting and the fertilizer and the harvesting and the storing and everything like that so I don't have to worry about that.
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: When the time comes I pay the rent. We've always managed to do that, so. [laughs]Aaron: Did the dust bowl affect you?Elizabeth: I dont think so.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: We had storms blow- they used to plow the land a lot more you know, and then the dust would blow. Sometimes it'd be hard to see accross the road but nothing- And we're high enough here, we never have any floods or anything, so. I would hate to live in some of those low places where they get floods all the time.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Did you ever start to change the way they plowed so the dust wouldn't blow so much? Like try different ways of farming or-?Elizabeth: Well we didn't, while my husband was alive, but then when my son took it over and they started notetailing and not plowing it up in the fall anyway, things like that.
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: And then they started using more fertilizer. We never used fertilizer when we were farming. We hauled out the manure. [laughs]Aaron: Yeah.Elizabeth: And we kept horses for a while and we kept cows and cattle longer than that.
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: There was always manure to put out on the fields and that was your fertilizer.Aaron: Yeah. Yeah.Elizabeth: But now they just have somebody come out with a big tank and spray something around and that's it.Aaron: Yeah.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: We don't have any cattle on the place. Use to have hogs and then they got to smelling so bad we did away with that. [laughs]
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Did you ever keep any of the cattle or cows just for old times sake?Elizabeth: No, well there were some old things on the place but got rid of it eventually. There was even one small slay in the rafters of the corn cribAaron: What's a shay?Elizabeth: Slay
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Oh slay okay.Elizabeth: [laughs] But it was up in the rafter of the corn crib but I decided it didn't need to be there anymore so I sold it for 100 dollars [laughs]
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: Somebody maybe wanted to restore it. I've seen restored little slays. Have you seen?Aaron: Uh-huh.Elizabeth: In the Brenton Bank they usually have one at Christmas time I think.
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: Anyway in the creamery (?) when I first came out here there was a buggy. And you'd hitch up horses to a buggy and have a buggy ride [laughs]Aaron: Oh yeah.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: And one, while I was still teaching, before we were married, I don't know if it was Easter Sunday or what but anyway I had a new outfit, real light colours, a new spring coat but the road from here to where I was staying was just bottomless.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: And it was gravel and there were so many big holes in it that the car couldn't get from here to 3 miles North. So my husband hitch up the buggy with horses and took me home in the buggy [laughs]
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: My boyfriend I should say [laughs]Aaron: Oh I see.Elizabeth: But my coat got all splattered with mud.Aaron: Oh
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: So highway 6 has been here for a long time.Elizabeth: Oh yeah, it was paved at that time. Maybe it was just gravel when I first came out to teach but then it was paved and then after we were married it was widened quite a bit and they had to go all along here.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Did you lose some land from that?Elizabeth: Yeah. In front of our house we had a whole big row of mapple trees and all of them had to be taken out when they widened the road. So. And then when they widened 63 up here it was quite of summer of activity.
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: Everybody was torn up from here to Tama I guess. But it made a nice road. But that road was just gravel when I lived up there. At the Water school. I think we had 4 buckles over shoes I can't even remember how I kept warm.Aaron: [laughs]
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Girls didn't wear slacks in those days. I didn't own a pair of slacks or anything when I was teaching school [laughs]. But I think I wore wool stockings [laughs] and weighed the dress until I got to school to build a fire and get things started.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: What kind of things did you teach? I mean I know you taught reading and writing to that beginner.Elizabeth: Yeah well, geography and physiology and history and English, grammar, all that language, reading, writing, arithmatic. We had regular writing classes, penmanship classes were important. You had to learn penmanship.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: You had to learn how to write [laughs] and music. Art you might say, on Friday afternoons maybe we'd let them sketch a picture and draw something and copy something and artistic things like that to paste in the windows.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Did you ever take any field trips?Elizabeth: No. [laughs] No cars, no place to go.Elizabeth: Oh yeah, I guess that's true [both laugh]
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Yeah a field trip would just be walking outside, that's the field.Elizabeth: We had the big whole school yard for them to roam around in and play in and then there were wildflowers under the trees and things like that. We'd maybe talk about nature a little bit sometimes.
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: And then at the end of the school year you would always have to have a picnic.Aaron: Of course.Elizabeth: And the families would come and you would have a picnic at the end of the school year.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Okay what about [mumbles something referencing a pump outside]Elizabeth: Oh that's always been there. But it was up on a different platform and everything. It's been there all these years. We used the wellwater until about 3 years ago when I went on the rural water system and we stop using that you know.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: Because the system went dry that summer and the well almost went dry. We had to do something and I went on the rural water. We got water piped all over the county, well almost every county now.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: So. But we never had to pay water bills, or garbage bills [laughs] anything like that when we were raising our families. We did have an electric light bill. That was a monthly bill that came in. And we used to burn wood in our furnace and things like that you know, we didn't have these expenses.
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: But they harder things too. My husband and his father would have to go out and saw wood for the winter.Aaron: Would you go out and cut a Christmas tree too?Elizabeth: Oh yeah, we always had- we don't have any fir trees on the farm but we managed to have a christmas tree.
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Were Christmases a pretty big celebration?Elizabeth: Well, we usually went to Des Moines when the kids were little because my folks were up there. We'd have a Christmas Eve with my husband's folks. That wasn't much of a celebration. But not much family. We'd go to Des Moines and I'd have my brother and sisters.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: And cousins. We had cousins in Des Moines at that time so we'd go to Des Moines for Christmas day. On old number 6. Had to go through Colfax and don't remember any of the names. Kellogg, not Kellogg.
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: Old number 6 anyway. And some towns. Narrow roads and up and down and my husband could drive pretty fast too it's a wonder we made those trips because he would drive awfully fast.Aaron: [laughs]
  • Aaron Lane & Elizabeth Schultz
    Aaron: Is that the Model T?Elizabeth: Oh what was the next? A chevy or A something. I don't know. I don't know. Anyway.
  • Elizabeth Schultz
    Elizabeth: We needed 2 seater cars after we had the kids [laughs]
  • Elizabeth Schultz & Aaron Lane
    Elizabeth: That's about enough isn't it?Aaron: Yeah that's great. [laughs] Just whenever [tape ends]
Elizabeth Pfund was born in Jewell, Iowa. She came to Poweshiek County in 1927 as a rural school teacher. She married Ervin Schultz on Nov. 27, 1929. They raised their two children on the family farm in Malcom Township where she lived for over 65 years. She was active in 4-H, the Farm Bureau, and she served as a Sunday school teacher and in other positions at Trinity Lutheran Church.